Low Oxalate Kitchen Guacamole Recipe Gluten Free Dairy Free Vegan Avocado Onion Cilantro Lime Jalapeno

Low Oxalate Kitchen Guacamole with Ripe, Hass Avocados

If you’ve been looking for the perfect healthy, gluten-free, dairy-free, low oxalate snack, you are in luck!

Guacamole is one of my all-time favorite things to eat, and I especially love it for its versatility. It’s perfect for eating right out of the bowl, scooping up with any of your favorite veggies, or putting a spoonful or two on top of your lunch or dinner to add a little spice to your life.

If you are wondering how in the world guacamole can be low in oxalate, the answer is it definitely can, but you have to watch for a couple of details. Depending on which resource you use to get your oxalate values, avocados can be anywhere from low oxalate to very high oxalate.

I follow the Trying Low Oxalates list, so I make sure I buy Hass avocados, and wait until they are just to the point where if they get any more ripe they won’t be edible. The more ripe the avocado is, the less oxalates it will have. If you want, add some diced cucumber to the recipe for a little bit of crunch, or some cayenne pepper for a little extra flavor and an extra kick!

Let me know what you think or what else you are looking for in the comments below! I especially hate when I have to scroll down for what seems like hours on a blog post to find a recipe, so, without further ado…

Low Oxalate Kitchen Guacamole with Ripe, Hass Avocados

Recipe by Vincent CilentoCourse: Appetizer, Snack, SidesCuisine: Mexican
Servings

6

servings
Prep time

30

minutes
Estimated Oxalate Content

Ingredients

  • 3 very ripe Hass avocados

  • salt, to taste

  • 1 small onion

  • 2 cloves garlic

  • 1 small jalapeno

  • 1/4 cup copped cilantro

  • juice from 1/2 lime

Directions

  • Dice up the onion, garlic, jalapeno and cilantro and add to a mixing bowl. Add lime juice and give it a quick stir. (I like to do this step first, this way I don’t overmix the avocado once it’s in the bowl. It lets you keep a few chunks of avocado so the finished product has some more texture and isn’t too creamy.)
  • Add the avocado to the bowl, and add salt directly on top of the avocado. I don’t know if it’s true, but it seems like adding salt any other time/not directly to the avocado doesn’t allow it to bring out all of the flavor of the avocado.
  • Give it a quick mix to your desired consistency, and enjoy!
  • Storage
  • *To store any leftovers, add a little bit more lime juice to the top of the guacamole after you put it into a container, or lightly press down a piece of saran wrap to the top of the guacamole. Being in contact with the air will make it turn brown faster, so the lime juice or the saran wrap will keep it from spoiling faster.

2 Comments

  1. i thought i had to give up avacodo?? they have to be very ripe?? how do you know?

    • Hi Rose! I use the Trying Low Oxalates spreadsheet for reference. They have tested a very large variety of foods, including different types of avocados at different stages of ripeness. I highly recommend joining their group on Facebook as well and getting the spreadsheet. If you need some help sorting through it let me know!

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